IGUANAS

Nicaragua is home to a diverse group of iguanas that are found throughout the country in a variety of habitats. Most of the iguanas in Nicaragua are primarily herbivorous, feeding on a variety of leaves, fruits, and flowers, although some species may also eat insects or small vertebrates. Many iguanas are also known for their ability to bask in the sun for long periods of time to regulate their body temperature.

Iguanas play important roles in their ecosystems as both predators and prey. They are important herbivores that help to shape plant communities, and they are also eaten by a variety of predators, including birds of prey, snakes, and mammals. In addition, iguanas are important cultural and economic resources in some parts of Nicaragua, where they are hunted for their meat, skins, and other parts.

Unfortunately, some species of iguanas in Nicaragua are threatened by habitat loss and hunting, and conservation efforts are needed to protect these animals and their habitats. In recent years, there have been efforts to conserve and protect iguanas in Nicaragua, including through habitat restoration, captive breeding programs, and public education initiatives.

Green iguana (Iguana iguana): The green iguana is the most common species of iguana found in Nicaragua. It is a large, arboreal lizard that can grow up to 6 feet in length, although females are generally smaller than males. Green iguanas have a distinctive appearance, with long, spiny tails, crests of scales along their backs, and a dewlap (flap of skin) under their chins that they use for communication. They are primarily herbivorous, feeding on a variety of leaves, fruits, and flowers, and are known for their ability to bask in the sun for long periods to regulate their body temperature. Green iguanas can be found throughout Nicaragua, from lowland forests to urban areas.

Black spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura similis): The black spiny-tailed iguana, also known as the “black iguana,” is found in the Pacific coastal region of Nicaragua. It is a medium-sized iguana that can grow up to 3 feet in length, with a stocky build and sharp, spiny tail. Black spiny-tailed iguanas are primarily herbivorous, feeding on a variety of plants and flowers, but they may also eat insects and small vertebrates. They are well adapted to living in arid environments and are commonly found in rocky areas and on walls or buildings in urban areas.

Common chuckwalla (Sauromalus ater): The common chuckwalla is found in the dry, rocky regions of northwestern Nicaragua, particularly in the Maribios volcanic chain. It is a medium-sized lizard that can grow up to 18 inches in length, with a heavily armored body and flattened tail that helps it wedge itself into crevices. Chuckwallas are primarily herbivorous, feeding on a variety of cactus and succulent plants, and are known for their ability to survive in extremely arid environments with little water.

Rhinoceros iguana (Cyclura cornuta): The rhinoceros iguana is not native to Nicaragua, but it has been introduced to the country and can be found in some areas. It is a large, heavy-bodied lizard that can grow up to 4 feet in length, with a distinctive, horn-like projection on its snout that gives it its name. Rhinoceros iguanas are primarily herbivorous, feeding on a variety of leaves, fruits, and flowers, and are known for their ability to dig burrows and spend long periods underground to avoid extreme temperatures. They are found in rocky or scrubby habitats and are generally more solitary than other species of iguanas.